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Home Automation

posted Oct 21, 2014, 6:51 PM by Leroy Dyer   [ updated Oct 21, 2014, 6:57 PM ]


HomeSeer includes a built-in web server, giving you access to all your devices from anywhere in the world using any web browser. The program works great if you have a DSL or a cable modem internet connection. Simply leave your computer running, enable the web server, and you're all set! If you don't have a full time internet connection, you can still dial in to your computer and access your devices. Future updates to the software are free. Updates will be posted periodically on the download page. Registered users will receive email notifications when an update is available. Major upgrades may incur a chargeYou will need some Z-Wave control modules along with the Z-Wave USB computer interface before HomeSeer is able to control your lights and appliances. Starter kits are available.

 

Gunn Systems In addition to providing professional Home Automation Development consulting, Gunn Systems offers several Home Automation Software products. Home Automation Software from Gunn Systems includes:X10-LITE. A Lightweight Utility to turn on/off and dim lights/appliances without a lot of hoopla. X10 ActiveX Control. This plug-in control allows developers to easily add X10 interfaces to any ActiveX-compatible software, such as Microsoft® Visual Studio, Microsoft® Office, etc. HomeLink. A full-featured software suite, with everything you expect in a professional Home Automation package.

 


Home Automated Living You've heard a lot about smart homes and you think it sounds great. But you're not sure if you want to try it because you have no experience with a house that's smart. Well, congratulations! Home Automated Living created HALbasic just for YOU!HAL’s Web Portal will enable users to control and interact with their homes over the Internet.  (The HAL Voice Portal was introduced first because phones are more accessible than the Web.)  The HAL Web portal will become the user interface for the home network -- the place where the family will go to communicate, to schedule, to play and to order services like take-out dinners or movies delivered over the broadband Internet connection coming into the home!

 

Girder is the most powerful and feature rich Windows automation tool available. Girder controls programs like WinAmp and Windows Media Player using infrared and wireless remote controls so you can sit back and enjoy your digital library from your couch. In Home Theater PC's, Girder controls Windows programs (media/DVD players) and hardware devices (sound cards, X10 and serial devices such as projectors, and receivers). Girder is the behind the scenes glue providing full control of your multimedia experience.

The conceptnet module

posted Oct 21, 2014, 6:35 PM by Leroy Dyer   [ updated Oct 21, 2014, 6:35 PM ]




ConceptNet 5 comes largely from the hard work of hundreds of thousands of people who gave their time and knowledge for free. So ConceptNet is free as well, released under a choice of two Creative Commons licenses:

You can get the entirety of ConceptNet 5 under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license.
You may also use a smaller version, called the "ConceptNet 5 Core", under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license. This version is free for any purpose as long as you give credit to the Digital Intuition team. However, this version is necessarily missing a large number of statements learned from Wikipedia, Wiktionary, and DBPedia, all of which are Attribution-ShareAlike resources.

The conceptnet module


  • BI METHODOLOGIES Methodologies Development Lifecycle In developing a business intelligence project or solution, there are some different perspectives, whereas some believe that there are no specific methodologies one would say that a ...
    Posted Oct 16, 2014, 3:27 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • DASHBOARDS / SCORECARDS / METRICS DASHBOARDS / SCORECARDS / METRICS The creation and deployment of dashboards and scorecards is also a key factor in presenting business intelligence data. Operational / Strategic often referred to Executive and Analytical are ...
    Posted Apr 21, 2016, 5:16 PM by Leroy Dyer
  • LOCATIONAL INTELLIGENCE Locational Intelligence This offers annalists an additional level of analytic capability the ability to have multiple layers of information is a key requirement to the business intelligence process as organization ...
    Posted Apr 21, 2016, 5:17 PM by Leroy Dyer
Showing posts 1 - 3 of 10. View more »

Relations

class csc.conceptnet.models.Relation(*args**kwargs)

Relation(id, name, description)

ConceptNet has a closed class of Relations, expressing connections between Concepts. This is the current set of relations, according to what question they each answer:

IsA                   | What kind of thing is it?
HasA                  | What does it possess?
PartOf                | What is it part of?
UsedFor               | What do you use it for?
AtLocation            | Where would you find it?
CapableOf             | What can it do?
MadeOf                | What is it made of?
CreatedBy             | How do you bring it into existence?
HasSubevent           | What do you do to accomplish it?
HasFirstSubevent      | What do you do first to accomplish it?
HasLastSubevent       | What do you do last to accomplish it?
HasPrerequisite       | What do you need to do first?
MotivatedByGoal       | Why would you do it?
Causes                | What does it make happen?
Desires               | What does it want?
CausesDesire          | What does it make you want to do?
HasProperty           | What properties does it have?
ReceivesAction        | What can you do to it?
DefinedAs             | How do you define it?
SymbolOf              | What does it represent?
LocatedNear           | What is it typically near?
ObstructedBy          | What would prevent it from happening?
ConceptuallyRelatedTo | What is related to it in an unknown way?
InheritsFrom          | (not stored, but used in some applications)
text
A standardized string naming this relation.
  • Creating a chatbot - Adding a plugin mechanism In this lesson , you will be shown how to create an interface to allow for external plugins to be added to your AI, Compile on the fly. A DLL file ...
    Posted Dec 13, 2014, 9:35 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • Creating the chat bot 3 - The speech Addon  Speech is an important part of communication, the microsoft speech API offers all we need to consume. Lets Use it!The speech add on : here we add Microsoft speech to ...
    Posted Oct 26, 2014, 5:30 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • Creating a chatbot 2 Creating a GUI for the artificial intelligence is an important part of the design process. the look and feel of the app can also give you the feeling and look ...
    Posted Oct 26, 2014, 5:08 AM by Leroy Dyer
Showing posts 1 - 3 of 5. View more »

Scripting for Conceptual Respresentation

posted Oct 21, 2014, 6:21 PM by Leroy Dyer   [ updated Oct 21, 2014, 6:46 PM ]

Knowledge representation

 

Knowledge representation is crucial. One of the clearest results of artificial intelligence research so far is that solving even apparently simple problems requires lots of knowledge. Really understanding a single sentence requires extensive knowledge both of language and of the context. For example, today's (4th Nov) headline ``It's President Clinton'' can only be interpreted reasonably if you know it's the day after the American elections. [Yes, these notes are a bit out of date]. Really understanding a visual scene similarly requires knowledge of the kinds of objects in the scene. Solving problems in a particular domain generally requires knowledge of the objects in the domain and knowledge of how to reason in that domain - both these types of knowledge must be represented.

 

Knowledge must be represented efficiently, and in a meaningful way. Efficiency is important, as it would be impossible (or at least impractical) to explicitly represent every fact that you might ever need. There are just so many potentially useful facts, most of which you would never even think of. You have to be able to infer new facts from your existing knowledge, as and when needed, and capture general abstractions which represent general features of sets of objects in the world.

 

Knowledge must be meaningfully represented so that we know how it relates back to the real world. A knowledge representation scheme provides a mapping from features of the world to a formal language. (The formal language will just capture certain aspects of the world, which we believe are important to our problem - we may of course miss out crucial aspects and so fail to really solve our problem, like ignoring friction in a mechanics problem). Anyway, when we manipulate that formal language using a computer we want to make sure that we still have meaningful expressions, which can be mapped back to the real world. This is what we mean when we talk about the semantics of representation languages



Scripts are used by humans, in a sense.
 
Imagine you hear this story: "Bob went to the shops. Ten minutes later, he walked out with his shopping and went home." 

You make a few assumptions - that Bob bought the shopping, that Bob was short of a few items etc. 

The reason you know this is because you follow a script unconsciously in your head. You know the basic outline of shopping (due to experience) and you can fill in the details, and make assumptions from the rest. 

Let's look at another story: "Bob went to the gardeners. He asked the waiter for a BMW and left." Now, this story makes no sense whatsoever to the normal person! This is because is does not follow the "gardeners-script". Gardeners don't have waiters, nor do they sell BMW's!

A concept can become a a part of multiple trains of thought having many connections, connections are often via "Linking Verbs".
Is a, Has the color, eats, is the size....


Having said that CR programs are incredibly difficult to program, 
that doesn't mean such programs don't exist. 

All have been demonstration, proof-of-concept programs. these models can be created using the object oriented programming paradigm. 




  • Creating a chatbot - Adding a plugin mechanism In this lesson , you will be shown how to create an interface to allow for external plugins to be added to your AI, Compile on the fly. A DLL file ...
    Posted Dec 13, 2014, 9:35 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • Creating the chat bot 3 - The speech Addon  Speech is an important part of communication, the microsoft speech API offers all we need to consume. Lets Use it!The speech add on : here we add Microsoft speech to ...
    Posted Oct 26, 2014, 5:30 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • Creating a chatbot 2 Creating a GUI for the artificial intelligence is an important part of the design process. the look and feel of the app can also give you the feeling and look ...
    Posted Oct 26, 2014, 5:08 AM by Leroy Dyer
  • Regular Expression Syntax (Scripting) A regular expression describes one or more strings to match when you search a body of text. The expression serves as a template for matching a character pattern to the ...
    Posted Oct 21, 2014, 6:38 PM by Leroy Dyer
  • Creating the chatbot Chat botsAs you know, the chat-bot is a chatting robot that can understand what you are saying, analyse it and give you a suitable response. It's considered ...
    Posted Oct 20, 2014, 5:32 AM by Leroy Dyer
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 5. View more »

Perhaps one of the most famous AI programs, SAM (Script Applier Mechanism) was developed in 1975 by Richard Cullingford, Wendy Lehnert, Anatole Gershman and Jaime Carbonell. It was designed to read stories that followed basic scripts, and output summaries in several languages, and create questions and answers based on the text.

SAM had 4 basic modules: a parser and generator based on a previous program, then the main module - the Script Applier (by Cullingford), the question-answer module (Lehnert), and the Russian and Spanish generators (Gershman and Carbonell, respectively)


Here is some sample output from SAM:

Input:
Friday evening a car swerved off Route 69.  The vehicle struck a tree.
The passenger, a New Jersey man, was killed.  David Hall, 27, was
Pronouced dead at the scene by Dr. Dana Blanchard, medical examiner.  
frank Miller, 32, of 592 Foxon Rd., the driver, was taken to Milford 
Hospital by Flanagan Ambulance.  He was treated and released.  No
charges were made.  Patrolman Robert Onofrio investigated the accident.

English Summary:
AN AUTOMOBILE HIT A TREE NEAR HIGHWAY 69 FOUR DAYS AGO.  DAVID HALL, 
AGE 27, RESIDENCE IN NEW JERSEY, THE PASSENGER, DIED.  FRANK MILLER, 
AGE 32, RESIDENCE AT 593 FOXON ROAD IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, THE 
DRIVER, WAS SLIGHTLY INJURED.  THE POLICE DEPARTMENT DID NOT FILE 
CHARGES.

Spanish Summary:
UN AUTO CHOCO CONTRA UN ARBOL CERCA DE LA CARRETERA 69 EL VIERNES AL
ANOCHECER.  DAVID HALL, DE 27 ANOS, QUE VIVIA EN NEW JERSEY, EL 
PASAGERO, SE MURIO.  FRANK MILLER, DE 32 ANOS, QUE VIVIA EN 593 CALLE
FOXON EN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, EL CHOFER, QUEDO UN POCO HERIDO. EL
DEPARTAMENTO DE POLICA NO ACUSO A NADIE.

Question-Answering Output:

Q1: Was anyone killed?
A1: YES, DAVID HALL DIED

Q2: Was anyone hurt?
A2: YES, FRANK MILLER WAS SLIGHTLY INJURED.

Q3: Why was Miller hurt?
A3: BECAUSE THE AUTOMOBILE HIT THE TREE.

Q4: Did Miller go to the hospital?
A4: YES, HE WAS IN THE MILFORD HOSPITAL.

Q5: How did Miller get to the hospital.
A5: THE FLANAGAN AMBULANCE COMPANY TOOK HIM TO THE MILFORD HOSPITAL.

 

SAM had a few shortcomings, though. If a story digressed from a script, SAM would have a hard time. A program that handled stories with more complicated plots, and characters would need more complicated structures. 

.

Athena Project

posted Oct 18, 2014, 6:04 AM by Leroy Dyer   [ updated Oct 18, 2014, 6:13 AM ]

A preview of the Athena project by Arron Snow <SNOWMAN> http://aaronwsnow.com

 
An example of Custom AI, The Steps, The Mind-Set... Why are people so interested in AI. How do we go about building an AI?
These are just a few of the questions that Snowman reveals, while giving us a sneak preview of things to come...

The Athena Project -Update August 2009- Part1


The Athena Project -Update August 2009- Part2


IS A-I POSSIBLE

posted Oct 18, 2014, 4:42 AM by Leroy Dyer   [ updated Oct 18, 2014, 5:08 AM ]

Human intelligence involves both ``mundane'' and ``expert'' reasoning. By mundane reasoning I mean all those things which (nearly) all of us can routinely do (to various abilities) in order to act and interact in the world. This will include:

 

  • Vision: The ability to make sense of what we see.
  • Natural Language: The ability to communicate with others in English or another natural language.
  • Planning: The ability to decide on a good sequence of actions to achieve your goals.
  • Robotics: The ability to move and act in the world, possibly responding to new perceptions.












Before we embark on a course in Artificial Intelligence, we should consider for a moment whether automating intelligence is really possible!

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/onlinestuff/people/alan%20turing.aspx
In 1936, the British mathematician Alan Turing developed the concept of the Turing Machine essentially and “Automatic Machine”, this has been attributed to being the first “artificial Intelligence” in 1950 Alan Turing release a paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence”, he proceeded to pose the question “Can Machines Think?”. This topic has become a major debate and topic of study amongst many computer scientists. 
“When talking about the Turing Test today what is generally understood is the following: The interrogator is connected to one person and one machine via a terminal, therefore can't see her counterparts. Her task is to find out which of the two candidates is the machine, and which is the human only by asking them questions. If the machine can "fool" the interrogator, it is intelligent.” [1]In 1966, Joseph Weizenbaum, created the first chat bot, essentially a computer program capable of conversation, it was based upon “Rogerian” principles by Sigmund Freud, a renowned doctor, attributed as the founder of modern psychiatry. This chat bot known as ELIZA, Also known as the computer psychiatrist has been created in BASIC / JAVA and other implementations have arisen since its inception. The principles used in these programming languages have become a baseline to anybody creating chat bots or decision based help support systems. 

In 1990, Dr. Hugh Loebner, challenged the artificial intelligence community to create a computer program capable of passing the “Turing Test”, since this time there have been many winners. Each year a prize is given, free to enter. A series of questions are asked, to which the computer has to formulate answers. These answers determine the winner of the contests.


http://www.alicebot.org/bios/richardwallace.html
In 1995, Richard Wallace, at Lehigh University created A.L.I.C.E “Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity”. Richard Wallace, also created an assistant language AIML, “Artificial Intelligence Markup Language”, this is used in conjunction with manipulating the conversational elements in the programming of the artificial intelligence. A.L.I.C.E was rewritten in java in 1998 this implementation Program D, has become a model for others who have begun building chat bots using this scripting specification. A.L.I.C.E has also been a winner of the “Loebner Prize”

http://www.zabaware.com/home.html
In 2000, Robert Medeksza, released his creation of Ultra HAL Assistant. This artificial intelligence created with C++, with external VB Scripting offers the user the ability to tailor the personality of the artificial intelligence. The program consists of various algorithms with keywords or triggers to define the user input, also using Word Net as a lexical tool in defining parts of speech. Robert Medeksza, also followed past winners of the “Loebner Prize”

Artificial intelligence research makes the assumption that human intelligence can be reduced to the (complex) manipulation of symbols, and that it does not matter what medium is used to manipulate these symbols - it does not have to be a biological brain! This assumption does not go unchallenged among philosophers etc. Some argue that true intelligence can never be achieved by a computer, but requires some human property which cannot be simulated. There are endless philosophical debates on this issue.


There are therefore a number of positions that you might adopt:

  1. Computers will never even appear to be really intelligent, though they might do a few useful tasks that conventionally require intelligence.
  2. Computers may eventually appear to be intelligent, but in fact they will just be simulating intelligent behavior, and not really be intelligent.
  3. Computers will eventually be really intelligent.
  4. Computers will not only be intelligent, they'll be conscious and have emotions.



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